For Want of an Emergency Injection!

Some people wonder why I keep going on about Adrenal Insufficiency, and key trying to raise awareness. The reason is, knowledge can save lives.

Recently I wrote a booklet called “Did you really just say that”. It is a compilation of quotes from Medical professionals to Addison’s patients and was written because of a discussion in a closed forum about what Dr’s had said to various patients about Adrenal Insufficiency.

The reality of what has been said by medical professionals (some who should know a lot more about the condition) and why we all have a problem with it, has been hit home to us all in a way none of us thought possible.

On 4th of January a beautiful young lady called Katie (24) had a common virus. This was something any normal person would shake off. She had started to feel unwell so went to bed. At some point during the night she was found by her parent unconscious and not breathing after they heard her fall..

They called an ambulance. They could not give her an emergency injection at home as they didn’t have one. The Ambulance service could not give her an emergency injection, they didn’t carry one.

Her Dr had previously said:

“It’s not a big deal, you should just take your hydrocortisone and you should be fine, don’t be over dramatic with the injection, you live near ER’s it’s not that necessary.”

Derek was also told after diagnosis that in New Zealand we were never that far from a hospital, so would never need an emergency injection. We ignored the Endocrinologist that said that and always make sure he has his on him. And this proves us right to do so.

Those with adrenal insufficiency are always told “don’t take extra hydrocortisone unless you have a temperature, are vomiting or are injured.”

With Adrenal Insufficiency,
when you go down,
you can go down fast!
Really fast!!

Kate was a college junior. After struggling for a while, in 2015 she began to improve and was able to return to college and start “living” again.

Then one day at the beginning of this year her mother announced on her facebook page”

medical

“On Sunday Katie became just slightly nauseous, a possible stomach bug. She said she was managing, no vomiting yet. Sometime through the night she must have become very ill. With Addison’s Disease the electrolytes can plummet dangerously low very suddenly At 6:30am Dave and I heard a loud crash. She had collapsed in her bathroom. It took a minute, two? to get into her room as her door was locked. She was not breathing. Dave began CPR, EMT’s were summoned and arrived in 2 minutes. Thank God we live close to the station. Thank God we were home. She was rushed to the trauma unit, unresponsive, but stabilized medically. We were told she had suffered cardiac arrest and later informed of multiple strokes. She was moved to the critical care unit and placed on hypothermic cooling to save brain function.  Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday she remained on full life support. She is fighting. Yesterday she responded to me warming her feet and nodded her head when I asked if she wanted a warmed blanket. She was on so many means of support that her room had to be specially cooled due to the heat of the machines.

…… 36 days on:   “[we both felt] bullied by this pompous, arrogant man who has no right to be a Dr. So much for taking a life threatening disease seriously. And so this continued from one [hospital] Endo to the next. Not one ever treated this disease with the knowledge or respect or seriousness that it deserves. Katie was so under and over medicated that she was hospitalized more than 45 times the first 4 years after diagnosis.

For the past year she had it more under control without using an Endo, her GP was managing her better than anyone before.

So as I sat in our friend’s home yesterday, the three of us crying as [my daughter] lies in a subacute care home, we wondered; would she be our beautiful vivacious Katie right now had she not been undereducated and intimidated by her Dr’s?
For now I will have to speak up for [my daughter] and all of the Addison’s patients because she can’t speak and likely never will. Her time spent in a PVS condition has been painful, muscles contracting, infections, and unable to communicate or even swallow. We are in a cloudy state of day to day confusion with no real prediction of her future. We are for now, just day to day.”

 

For those that don’t know, a PVC condition is a Persistent Vegetative State. A coma like state that she is not likely to come out of. She suffered a heart attack and multiple strokes.

I was going to post this originally on Rare Disease Awareness Day which was 29 February. But that day we were notified of a 13 yr old boy who had Addison’s, who had also got a virus. He went into crisis before his parents realised what was happening. He too suffered irreparable brain and heart damage. He passed away 5 later.

Addison’s Disease Kills! And you never know when you may get a virus that will kill you, or how fast it will hit.

Quite often even though an Addisonian is admitted to hospital in Crisis, if they pass away, Crisis is not put down as the cause of death. It will be the heart attack, stroke, pneumonia, flu, or some other thing. Even if the Crisis caused the CVA/MI, or the pneumonia could have been survived if not for the AI. Hence many don’t realise that Addison’s Kills.

Am I angry/frustrated that this can happen in todays medical world? YES

Do I over react about the way Derek and others are treated by some in the medical profession regarding Adrenal Insufficiency? YES

Do I believe Wellington Hospital (CCDHB) should take more responsibility for their lack of communication that gave Derek this Life Threatening medical condition? ASBOLUTELY.

Do I believe that more medical staff need to be aware of this condition, and what to do? YES, especially ED staff.

Do Derek and I live in fear that he will again end up in hospital with multi-organ failure due to an Adrenal Crisis? OF COURSE. But we will not let that rule out lives and dictate what we do.

Having said that, we will take precautions against things like stomach bugs, the flu etc. So don’t be offended if you turn up on our door step with “only a common cold” or “just a little tummy upset” and expect to be welcomed with open arms. This little tummy upset that you are exposing my husband to could potentially kill him. That is not to say we will turn you away, but we will keep our distance.

Derek has gone into crisis in front of medical staff even after telling them we thought he would. When asked by his Endo later why he went into crisis, we thought about it. It was because we listened to his Endo about something we thought was an early sign of extremely low cortisol and impending crisis which the Endo was sure wasn’t. In fact, the Endo was adamant that it was not a sign of low cortisol. So Derek didn’t take extra cortisol until it was too late. He went from “just not feeling right, with this one symptom to crisis within an hour. Most of that time was spent in ED trying to get help.  We know better now.

The medical staff at the hospital ED department didn’t recognise the crisis when it happened. Why? Because a Crisis is never Text Book. Each Addisonian will react differently in crisis.  You will not get ALL the symptoms, only some of them. One of the key symptoms the medical staff look for is a decrease in BP to <90/50. The fact is, many AI sufferers have an Increase in BP to start because they have swallowed down so many steroids trying to avoid it. They will check your temperature but they won’t consider it high unless it is over 37.8 (Addison’s causes low body temp, many sitting around 36.0). They don’t tell you that in the medical books though. What medical staff look for is the signs and symptoms as written in the medical books. Unfortunately when you are that sick, you are being shipped off to ICU because you are in shock and your body is shutting down. Personally, I don’t want to see Derek like that again, and will therefore always insist he is treated before he gets to that point.

Two things help keep Derek and others stay out of hospital. One is self-education, and the other is a good support network.

Being told “just take these pills and you will live a normal life. Oh, and learn how to inject, but only after you have vomited 3 times” is not education. In fact, after you have vomited 2 times, you are probably verging on unconscious and incapable (unable to behave rationally or manage one’s affairs). You very seldom have the ability to give yourself an injection and very often don’t believe you need it because by then you brain is not telling you the truth. You are not going to be able to call an ambulance. You must be proactive and seek help before you get to that point. And those around you must make themselves aware of the symptoms so they can also help you.

We are lucky, we have the emergency injection, and have never needed it, although we almost had to use it in the emergency department, but they finally gave Derek the life saving injection he needed and were then shocked to see how quickly it worked.

But for the want of a US$10 injection Katie may not be in the PVC she is now in. Her family may not be sitting by her bed daily watching her in pain.  There is no knowing if giving this beautiful spirit her injection when she was “just feeling unwell” could have saved her from this. But it sure as hell would have given her a fighting chance!

Drs need to understand that what they say, can and does, have a big impact on their patients lives. Yet they never accept when they are wrong (or hardly ever).

 

aiunited

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For more on Katie and her battle, please read
http://aiunited.org/katies-story-adrenalcrisis/

 

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