Blue September

Man Up – Give Prostate Cancer The Finger

It is a few words, with a short reach.

If you go on line and ask for “Breast Cancer Catchphrases” you get hit after hit.  The top ones were:

85 best Breast Cancer catchphrases
71 best Breast Cancer catchphrases
50 top Breast Cancer catchphrases.

Yet when you do the same search for Prostate Cancer you get

Prostate Cancer Humour
Prostate Cancer Quote of the Day
Funny Cancer T-shirts

And the images are worse.  Images of young women with Breast cancer, or “representing” breast cancer.

When you search for images of men with Prostate Cancer, they are all over 65 and the most common quote?  “Lots of men die WITH Prostate Cancer but not OF Prostate Cancer”.

According to information on the New Zealand Prostate Cancer web site:

In New Zealand, prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men, around  3,000 registrations each year and about 600 deaths from prostate cancer each year (based on the statistics from the Ministry of Health 2007 – 2009 which show an average of 3082 registrations and 602 deaths).

Men who develop prostate cancer are mostly over the age of 65. It rarely occurs in men younger than 55. About one in 13 men will develop prostate cancer before the age of 75. In very elderly men, prostate cancer often grows very slowly and may cause no symptoms.

Some men are more at risk of getting prostate cancer than others, but the most important risk factor is ageing. Men with a family history of prostate cancer have a higher risk; that is, if the father, an uncle or a brother has had prostate cancer.

Sounds good doesn’t it?  Only 1 in 13 men develop Prostate Cancer before age 75, it RARELY occurs in men younger than 55.

Just as a comparison, according to the Breast Cancer Foundation of New Zealand, Breast Cancer is the #1 Cancer for women (same as prostate cancer in men), 3,000 new cases of Breast Cancer each year (same as men), 600+ deaths in a year (same as men).  What isn’t the same, is the awareness campaigns.  The only real differences are:
Men get Breast Cancer, Women don’t get Prostate Cancer,
Women are more likely to get it over the age of 50,
men, prostate cancer is more common over the age of 65.

Fantastic.  At 50, Derek should not have to worry about Prostate Cancer.  There is no history in his family of breast or prostate cancer, no history of any other form of hormone cancer, he is only early 50’s.  Absolutely NO reason to even consider he would have it.  There is no required routine screening.  There is no “when was your last DRE” at the Dr’s office the way you are asked about your last Smear.  There is no national recall every 2 years the way there is for a Mammogram over the age of 45.

Why would there be, at 50 it is very rare to get Prostate Cancer.  And according to a survey conducted by the Cleveland Clinic:

“It turns out that taller men, and men who have bigger body mass indexes are at higher risk of high grade prostate cancer, and also are at higher risk of dying of prostate cancer,” said Dr. Klein.

Dr. Klein said previous research has shown a connection between obesity and the risk of developing high grade prostate cancer, however the relationship with the height factor has not been noted previously.

Researchers surveyed data from more than 100,000 men and found that for every ten centimetres in height, the risk of developing an aggressive prostate cancer grew by 21 percent.

Not considered taller than average at 5’10”, a healthy weight, under 55, and no family history of Prostate Cancer, Derek is safe.

He might get Prostate Cancer in his 70’s or 80’s but who cares, a lot of men do, and “they don’t die of it, they die with it”.

But all the risk factors are just that, risk factors, not a guarantee that you won’t get prostate cancer.

So why am I blogging about Prostate Cancer on a Blog about Adrenal Insufficiency.

Because, if you haven’t already read the rest of this site, you may not know that Derek has AI because of a medical botch-up when he was having surgery for the prostate cancer that according to all the risk factors, he wasn’t at risk of getting.

We didn’t actually know a lot about Prostate Cancer when Derek was in his 40’s.  So how did he get diagnosed just a couple of years later?

A mixture of things.  At 50 he had he had a problem and went to the Doctor.  He was given DRE (Digital Rectal Exam).  It is far less invasive and embarrassing than a woman having a smear, yet men won’t talk about it let alone have it.  What man wants a stranger to shove his finger up your rectum?  Well get over it guys, you expect us woman to lay there while we have a very cold speculum put up your vagina, followed by a scraping tool, to take cells.  Men simply have 1 finger press down on the prostate, and out, that’s it.  20 seconds at most.  GET OVER YOURSELVES, YOUR RECTUM ISN’T THAT PRESCIOUS!!!!!

It turns out this DRE was actually not completely normal, but Derek wasn’t told that.  He was sent for blood tests to see if there was an infection.  The Dr also requested a PSA.  We didn’t take much notice of blood tests back then, so we didn’t look at what was being asked for, and certainly didn’t worry about the results.

By 52 we had forgotten all about it.  Then he got a soft calf injury that caused a DVT.  He was diagnosed with Antiphospholipid Syndrome (APS).  That’s fine, strange but fine.

By 2011 (at the age of 53) his PSA was rising but hadn’t hit the special number of 4. (It was close)

Then, at the beginning of February of 2012, a month after turning 54 his PSA shot up.  He was fit and healthy, he had APS but that was not cancer so no worries.

In May 2012 Derek had a positive biopsy for Prostate Cancer. Thankfully, because he was having his INR monitored for his Warfarin (because of the APS) he was also having PSA every 6 months.  The Dr had seen in increasing.  So he had had Prostate cancer since BEFORE he suffered a DVT.

After the positive biopsy we looked into the options available.  His Cancer was considered MODERATELY AGGRESSIVE, which meant that, without treatment he would die OF prostate cancer, not WITH prostate cancer.

So, Not overly tall, not over weight, under 55, no family history of hormonal cancer in the family (although his father had dies of leukaemia, but that’s wasn’t a risk factor for prostate cancer) yet he had prostate cancer.

Women are told all the time that you can get breast cancer even without the risk factors.  Men are not told the same.

Why Not?  What is it that makes it so important that a woman is checked for cancer, but a man is not.  Are men any less important?  Or is it because men make the decisions, and their decision is they don’t want that initial FINGER UP TO PROSTATE CANCER?

Some people believe that it is not necessary to have PSA checks, that the chances of prostate cancer killing you is not worth the effects of invasive testing that can be wrong, the worry, the removal of a prostate (and the very high probability of erectile dysfunction) is not worth it.

Well, those people can go elsewhere to comment.  I know that Derek would be terminal now, if not dead, if we hadn’t had the testing, the biopsy, and the surgery.

SEPTEMBER IS PROSTATE CANCER AWARENESS MONTH

Even if you don’t meet ANY of the risk factors for Prostate Cancer, YOU CAN STILL GET IT?

We didn’t know this, until we did!

 

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