What Does YOUR Adrenal Crisis Look Like?

April is Adrenal Insufficiency (Addison’s Disease) Awareness month in many countries of the world so I thought I would look at what an Adrenal Crisis is to those that suffer with Insufficiency.

I don’t mean, what does the medical world consider a crisis, but at what point do those that suffer AI believe they are in crisis, and at what stage do they feel they need medical intervention.

Let’s start with what a medical dictionary says is a CRISIS:

According to one online medical dictionary:

crisis

 [kri´sis] (pl. cri´ses) (L.)

  1. the turning point of a disease for better or worse; especially a sudden change, usually for the better, in the course of an acute disease.
  2. a sudden paroxysmal intensification of symptoms in the course of a disease.
  3. life crisis. – addisonian crisis (adrenal crisis) the symptoms accompanying an acute onset or worsening of addison’s disease: anorexia, vomiting, abdominal pain, apathy, confusion, extreme weakness, and hypotension; if UNTREATED  these progress to shock and then death.

Alterntively the Oxford Concise Medical Dictionary (9 ed.) states:

  1. the turning point of a disease, after which the patient either improves or deteriorates.

Neither of these sources, or any other I can find, state that a medical crisis is only once the patient has entered a state of hypovolemic shock.   In fact, the first one states it only progresses to shock if a Crisis is UNTREATED.  Yet SHOCK is what the Dr’s wait for, or believe to be a crisis, in the ED when an Adrenal Insufficiency patient presents.

Professor Bruno Allolio stated in his document EXTENSIVE EXPERTISE IN ENDOCRINOLOGY – Adrenal crisis

Bruno Allolio1,2,†

Prevention of adrenal crisis

Physiological endogenous glucocorticoid secretion (normal Cortisol production) is highly flexible with rapid adjustments to unexpected needs….

In the foreseeable future (if ever), no replacement therapy will be able to fully mimic this amazing adaptive potential of a healthy HPA axis.  However, many stressors can be anticipated (e.g. elective surgery) and allow to adjust the glucocorticoid dose to the expected need, thereby preventing the occurrence of clinical deterioration and adrenal crisis.  It is important to understand herein the underlying concept.  The recommended dose increase is not intended to mimic the median cortisol increase in healthy subjects during such procedures.  Instead, it is intended to mimic the maximum cortisol increase, which may occur in euadrenal (normal functioning adrenal gland) subjects triggered during these procedures, potentially induced by some unforeseen events (e.g. postoperative bleeding).  Patients with intact adrenal function can respond immediately to such problems with an increase in adrenal cortisol output.  By contrast, in adrenal insufficiency, additional glucocorticoids would only be given when clinical deterioration becomes evident.  Until then, valuable time may have been lost to adjust the hydrocortisone dose to the increased need.  For that reason, dose adjustments aim at the upper limit of the normal variation to cover such unexpected needs.

As infections are the most frequent cause of adrenal crisis, it has been suggested that the patient doubles the hydrocortisone dose if the body temperature increases above 38.0C and triples the dose above 39. 0C.  This dose is maintained as long as the fever persists and rapidly (within 1–2 days) reduced to the standard replacement dose after recovery.  Gastroenteritis poses a particularly high risk, as glucocorticoid availability may be compromised by vomiting and diarrhoea, while the demand is clearly increased.  Thus, early parenteral hydrocortisone (100 mg subcutaneously) is strongly recommended either via self-administration or by a physician.  This dose may need to be repeated and health-care professionals should be involved early for clinical assessment.  Similarly, in severe infection (e.g. pneumonia) with altered cognition, early parenteral hydrocortisone and medical help are warranted.

It has been suggested that patients today are at a greater risk of adrenal crisis, because they have less of a ‘cushion’ of excess circulating cortisol with a standard daily dose of 20 mg hydrocortisone compared with the old-fashioned standard dose of 30 mg hydrocortisone.  However, there is no scientific evidence for such a protective ‘cushion’ effect.  Instead, chronic over-replacement may rather increase the susceptibility to infection and thereby increase the risk of adrenal crisis.

Since his crisis in 2014 from pneumonia, we have learned when Derek is suffering low cortisol vs when he is needing medical assistance.  We have become very good at getting him to stress dose BEFORE he gets too sick.  He has had 3 infections in the last 2 years.  We have given him very high doses of steroids (up to 40mg in one dose over and above the 5 or 10 he would normally take).  What this meant was ignoring the Dr’s that stated that his first clear sign to US of Low Cortisol,

Doing this, and then getting him to a Dr to find out WHY he is so low, has saved us from having to use his emergency injection or taking him to the Emergency Department for urgent medical intervention so far.

That is not to say that one day we will get it wrong, or not be able to stop a crisis from getting to the emergency state and have to call an ambulance, but we are on the winning side at the moment.

It got me thinking what is it that tells an Addisonian (I am including SAI and PAI in this term for ease of typing) what are the first symptoms they have.  What is is for THEM that says, you need a high oral dose, or you need an injection or an ambulance.

Since Derek’s diagnosis in Oct 2012 we have learned a lot about AI.  The biggest thing we have learned is that NO TWO ADDISONIAN’S ARE THE SAME.  They all have different comorbidities, they all have different symptoms, they all have different knowledge levels, and most importantly they all have different support systems in place, from nothing, to fantastic.

All these things impact on how quickly things can go from good to bad to dead.

The final piece to this puzzle is the ability and knowledge of their endocrinologist.

  1. Have they been given the right advice on updosing and stress dosing, the right knowledge on when to use the emergency injection, have they even been prescribed the emergency injection (some don’t believe in giving it).
  2. Do they have confidence in the care they will receive when they call an ambulance or go to their Emergency Department.

These last two things can will make or break an Addisonian.

So this doesn’t tell us what an adrenal crisis actually is.  And this is the hard part.  I asked some of my Addisonian friends what their signs of crisis are.

Each person I asked gave a different answer.  The symptoms were very similar, but presented in a different order, different intensity, and different clusters.

Symptom #1 Symptom #2 Symptoms #3 Symptoms #4
· Feeling really tired    & listless and
generally blah
· Dizzy &
unbalanced
·  nausea
·  Hot and Sweaty
·  raging migraine
·  high BP
·  So tired just want
to sleep
·  seizures
·  Extremely fatigued,
·  lifeless legs
·  Dizziness
·  pain in abdomen,
·  low back and legs.
·  tachycardia
·  mostly high BP,
·  then it can plummet
·  Disorientated
·  Belief that rest will
fix us.
·  severe torso
spasms
· dizzy,
·  start to stagger,
·  ose balance,
·  barely lift feet, legs
feel like heavy jelly,
·  feel shaky,
·  nauseous/dry             reach.
·  Big D,
·  hard to talk, words
just don’t come out
right.
·  Back pain,
·  torso spasms.
·  Extreme fatigue
·  Abdominal pain
·  Gas/wind
·  headache
·  Speech goes
quiet
·  confusion
·  High BP
·  Light headed
·  Wants to sleep
·  Inability to speak
·  Nausea

 

Each one of these lists shows, a sudden paroxysmal intensification of symptoms in the course of a disease.

Yet the Addison’s Disease Self Help Group in the UK, and the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases have different definitions of a Crisis.

Symptom ADSHG NIDDK
Adrenal crisis Warning signs include:
·    severe nausea
·    headache
·    dizziness
·    extreme weakness
·    chills or fever
·    confusion.
Symptoms of adrenal crisis include
·    sudden, severe pain in the lower back,        abdomen, or legs
·    severe vomiting and diarrhoea
·    dehydration
·    low blood pressure
·    loss of consciousness

 

All the above experience the symptoms from the ADSHG, but they all also inject BEFORE they get to the severe vomiting, diarrhoea, and low blood pressure if they can.

These symptoms are those experienced with an infection.  A gastric bug is a whole different issue.

These 5 people know, from several years of experience, when they can take in more oral meds, vs when they need to inject.

Yet if they went to hospital, they would be told that they are not in crisis as they are not vomiting, their blood pressure is not low, and they are conscious.

If you break your leg, it’s obvious by Xray (mostly) that it’s broken.  If you have a heart attack, they can show it within minutes, stroke – signs and symptoms are clear, Hypo or Hyperglycaemic they test and they know what to do.  Arm sliced open and bleeding?  Dr’s, Nurses, and EMT’s know immediately to stem the flow of blood BEFORE shock sets in.

But when it comes to Adrenal Crisis there is no “test” they can do, many in the medical profession throughout the world don’t recognise it, don’t believe the patient (or their advocate) when they present in crisis, and unfortunately still don’t know how to treat it.

Many also won’t follow written instructions the patients carry, when you give them information.  We have seen people turned away being told “you are not in crisis”, but they clearly are.

Derek was at an after-hours Dr one day as we though he had a throat infection.  He couldn’t feel much pain as the infection was on the left side of his throat, which is numb from CAPS, and he can’t swallow on that side.  During the examination the Dr said “I don’t believe you need an emergency injection.”  My immediate response was “No, he is not in crisis.  IF we thought he was in crisis we wouldn’t be at After-Hours, we would be at Hospital.”

The Dr acknowledged we obviously knew what we were doing.

Another time we said to the Emergency Room Dr that Derek’s AI was under control, we were not there for that, we were there for another reason.  The Dr was happy with that and dealt with the issue we were there for.

One time that he was dropping fast into crisis, couldn’t keep her eyes open, couldn’t answer any more than yes/no answers, was in a lot of abdominal pain, was nauseous.  Yet the Dr had no idea, even when I pulled out all Derek’s medication and said I was giving him 20mg, the Dr’s question was “Do you really think he needs that much.”  And left his cubical Um, yes, he needs a lot more than that.

They believed us quite willingly when we said he was not in crisis, but when we knew he was heading that way, they didn’t believe us.  The 20mg didn’t do anything.  After finding an old letter a senior Dr from that ED had written, and giving it to a nurse, they finally gave him 100mg and admitted him.

So what is an Adrenal Crisis?

The image here shows THREE pathways to death from adrenal crisis.

One friend spent years having seizures during adrenal crisis.  Yet she was frequently told seizures were NOT part of the adrenal crisis pathway (Far Left Pathway, bottom symptom).

Others have been told, you can only be in crisis if you are vomiting (ONLY middle pathway mentions vomiting).

 

With the 3 pathways in adrenal crisis, and you can be suffering a mixture of symptoms from each.  You do not have to follow only one pathway.  Most medical books only talk about the middle pathway, and don’t look at the two outside ones.

Derek vomited a total of 4 times during his adrenal crisis and multi organ failure yet he was sick/near death for 3 weeks.  He did not vomit at all while in hospital.

If each Adrenal Insufficient patient presents differently, how are the medical world supposed to know what is wrong.

One size does not fit all.  And THAT is a serious problem, with no easy answer.  If someone seeks medical help for anything and they have Adrenal Crisis, they need that checked first.  The Dr need to ask the patient, do you think you need/have you taken emergency medication.

Most patients know if their oral steroids aren’t working.

Do you know YOUR signs?

Does your support person?

 

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Low Cortisol or an Adrenal Crisis – Learning the difference

(Low Cortisol or an Adrenal Crisis – PDF of this blog.)

CHECK OUT THE NEW PERSPECTIVE ON THIS POST HERE

Many with Addison’s Disease, especially in the early years after diagnosis, don’t have a clear understanding of what an Adrenal Crisis is­.

Some are very sick and believe it can be treated at home, others are low on cortisol and believe they urgently need Emergency Department treatments.  It can be very hard to tell the difference at times.

Then we have the Dr’s view, based on books, not on experience, which is, don’t know so won’t treat.

THE FACTS:

  1. Low Cortisol WILL lead to an Adrenal Crisis, if not dealt with;
  2. Adrenal Crisis DOES need Emergency Medical Treatment;
  3. Adrenal Crisis WILL lead to Death (or worse) if not treated urgently and correctly;
  4. Dr’s DO cause Adrenal Crisis’ because they don’t know, or don’t listen to their patients.

I am guessing the first thing you are asking is “What is worse than Death?”

Quite simply it’s Permanent Brain Damage, Permanent Heart Damage, Permanent disability.  Severe damage to other organs, and in many cases if you survive, PTSD.

An Adrenal Crisis can come on rapidly, or it can come on because you haven’t controlled the symptoms of low cortisol.  It may be because you have an infection and don’t know. There are many reasons for cortisol being used up quickly in your body.  Some of them obvious, some not so.

If you suffer a Genuine Adrenal Crisis and don’t get appropriate treatment fast, the ultimate outcome will be death.

Those with Adrenal Insufficiency and just as importantly, those who live with someone with Adrenal Insufficiency (Addison’s Disease) need to learn the difference in symptoms. And it isn’t something you can learn from a book because we are not all modelled on a book.  We are all human, with different functioning ability in our body.

It is also hard because there is a point when symptoms of low cortisol and an impending adrenal crisis meet.

And it is these symptoms that cause confusion.  If you can treat them by taking extra cortisol, then it is low cortisol.  If you can’t resolve the symptoms with oral medication, then it is the beginnings of a crisis.

Low Cortisol or Adrenal Crisis

From Low Cortisol to Adrenal Crisis

Click the image to see how the symptoms can present, and how they meet as you move from low cortisol to crisis. Most of these symptoms are not “in the book” as an adrenal crisis, and are not considered by many Dr’s as important enough to treat by bumping (updosing).

We all hear that if you have a major trauma, or vomit several times, or have a high temperature, inject.  If you have to inject, go to hospital.

But what about those symptoms in Blue above?  Should you be taking extra HC if you feel all or any of these symptoms.  Some of them occur every day for some people.   Other’s never experience them.

It’s always a guessing game.  Do you Up Dose, Stress Dose, or Inject and race to hospital.  What are these options?

Updosing:

To Updose is what Derek does when we are going out.  He will also do it if he is doing something more than normal around the house.  Perhaps he is going to help me do a little gardening or we are going to a Show, or out to Dinner.  Or if he begins to feel a certain sort of tired.  And here is the other problem.  How do we know if he is just tired because he has done more than normal, or tired because he is low on cortisol.

There is no hard and fast rule.  He had to learn to listen to his body.  We know that when he is tired, he gets sore hips or starts yawning in a certain way.  These are his first symptoms of low cortisol but it doesn’t mean he has to up dose.  It may just mean he needs to sit and rest.

The biggest clue for Derek is if he can’t keep his eyes open, he feels weak, or he gets a mild gas he can’t shift.  When this happens he will take an extra 2.5-5 mg of Hydrocortisone.  He will then lay down to rest and the symptoms will normally resolve themselves.

If he suffers more painful gas under the ribs, has gas that doesn’t ease on burping, has a headache and feels “blah”, he will “Stress dose”.  He will take 10-20 mg Hydrocortisone in one hit.  He will also then try to get to a Dr within 24 hours to find out why he is that low.

I has taken almost 4 years to learn the difference between all his symptoms, and how to respond to each.

When new to Adrenal Insufficiency we asked each of Derek’s treating Dr’s, including his Endocrinologist, if the symptoms he had were AI related.    The immediate response was no because it isn’t in the “book” as a symptom.

There is a belief within the medical community that If it’s not “in the book”, then it can’t be a symptom! In fact, you will not find any mention in medical books, about the concept of Updosing for minor stressors, or needing to take an extra 5 mg if you are going out somewhere.  Yet those that do updose, have less need to Stress Dose or inject.  That’s not to say the don’t do the latter two, they just appear to manage their illness a little better.

A good example of the need to updose to prevent the need to stress dose occurred recently.  We went to a quiz evening at a pub.  It takes 2 hours, and technically is a lot of stress free fun.  Derek has been twice now.  The first time he took 5 mg HC (2.5 mg more than normal) before going.  The second night he didn’t.

By the end of the second night you could see he was suffering from low cortisol.  He found it hard to move, was very stiff and sore in the hips, he was burping more than he should, his speech was quiet, and not “normal”, he was finding it hard to think clearly and he just wanted to go to sleep.  By the time we got home it was all he could do to get into bed.

According to the books, and many Dr’s, there is no need to take extra for these types of activities.

The next morning he woke and was very sluggish.  He found getting out of bed very hard and was not sure he would be able to work, but knew he had to.  He had to push himself all day.

The result of not taking an extra 2.5 mg for the non stressful quiz, was several days of being sluggish, with no energy and feeling ill . That 2.5 mg, although small in relative terms of his daily dose, would have been enough to make it a fun night, and be able to function the next day.  Not taking it meant he had to take things very easy work wise on Friday, and do nothing Saturday.  If it had been earlier in the week, but the end of the week he would have been stress dosing rather than updosing.

Stress Dosing

Stress dosing is something that IS in the books.  But it is not normally recommended until after you need it.  The problem with that is, sometimes it is too late.

When Derek gets really bad gas that won’t shift, we know it is a good sign that something is wrong.  After listening to the Dr’s, and ignoring it, and Derek ending up in Crisis in Hospital, we now take note of it.

This is when he will Stress Dose.  He will take 10-20 mg in one hit.  We will also either get an urgent appointment with his Dr, or I will take him to an after hours medical center, to get him checked over.  He normally has an infection.  He then continues with stress dosing for several days while most likely on antibiotics.

This gas, which the Dr’s have told him is NOT a symptom of an impending crisis, was the ONLY symptom he had before his last crisis.  It’s not in the books, therefore it isn’t real, but they can’t explain why ignoring it leads to a crisis.

When Derek went into Crisis in 2014 his Endocrinologist said he didn’t understand why the crisis happened.  Simply, we followed his advice and did as he said.  We don’t make that mistake now.

Once you get to this point, your meds may stop working because your stomach becomes upset, and you stop absorbing your them.  You are now on the steep slippery slope to full blown crisis.

Adrenal Crisis

If you have a full blown adrenal crisis, INJECT.  Don’t wait until you fit the medical definition of dangerously low blood pressure, unconsciousness, or constant vomiting.
Derek vomited for 1 day when he had his worst crisis, but he was in crisis for a week before they worked out what was wrong.

The Medical books that describe Adrenal Crisis also describe Hypovolmeic shock.

Hypovolemic shock
Hypovolemic shock is an emergency condition in which severe blood or fluid loss makes the heart unable to pump enough blood to the body. This type of shock can cause many organs to stop working.Causes
The amount of circulating blood in your body may drop when you lose too many other body fluids. This can be due to:
• Burns
• Diarrhea
• Excessive perspiration
VomitingSymptoms
Symptoms may include:
• Anxiety or agitation
• Cool, clammy skin
• Confusion
• 
Decreased or no urine output
• General weakness

• Pale skin color (pallor)
Rapid breathing
Sweating, moist skin
• UnconsciousnessThe greater and more rapid the blood loss, the more severe the symptoms of shock.
• Low blood pressure
• Low body temperature
• Rapid pulse, often weak and thread
Acute adrenal crisis
Acute adrenal crisis is a life-threatening condition that occurs when there is not enough cortisol. This is a hormone produced by the adrenal glands.Causes of adrenal crisis include:
• 
Dehydration
• Diarrhea
• 
Infection and other physical stress
• Injury to the adrenal or pituitary gland
• Stopping treatment too suddenly with glucocorticoid medicines
• Surgery
• Trauma (eg Burns)Symptoms
Symptoms and signs of adrenal crisis can include any of the following:
• Abdominal pain or flank pain
• Confusion, loss of consciousness, or coma
• Dehydration
• Dizziness or light-headedness
• Fatigue, severe weakness
• Headache
• High fever
• Loss of appetite
• Low blood pressure
• Nausea, vomiting
• Rapid heart rate
• Rapid respiratory rate
• Slow, sluggish movement
• Unusual and excessive sweating on face or palms

Dr’s treat hypovolemic shock as an incredibly serious recognised condition that must by given the highest priority.  Yet Adrenal Crisis, which can have the same symptoms, and same outcome of Death, is frequently ignored.

Many Dr’s, especially in Emergency Departments, have read a book once, a long time ago, about Adrenal Insufficiency.  The problem is, that book takes a long time to become medical education material.  The studies must be done, published, then peer reviewed. It then has to be used when writing “the book” (which can take years), then the book must be published (which can take another couple of years).  Once that has happened, it must be considered, and then accepted, as a good teaching tool.

By the time this has happened, there has already been better research, which is being peer reviewed, and published.  That research then has to wait years for the next “book” to be produced or updated.

The information is already old before it goes in the Book.  And Emergency Department Dr’s don’t read all the latest research when it comes out, if they did, they wouldn’t have time to work, so they skip over the specialist stuff that they were told in medical school they would never encounter.

Because many Dr’s don’t have the latest information, as the patient, you must have it. Join support groups so you can learn what is reliable, and what is old.  Good support groups keep abreast of all new information and medical knowledge.  Despite what Dr’s try and tell you, Dr Google can be your friend if used properly.

I have been in an emergency department and seen Dr’s use Google to find out about Derek’s conditions.  Yet some of these same Dr’s repost around the Internet, that great sign below that we have all seen.

If you have the unfortunate pleasure of attending a hospital because you are in an Adrenal Crisis you may be lucky enough to be treated by a Dr that has heard of Adrenal Insufficiency.  Unfortunately many do not get that lucky.  They suffer at the hands of Drs who do not understand a crisis.  Yet they understand shock.  For this reason, you must know the difference between the three dosing styles.

UPDOSE – STRESS DOSE – INJECT

Learn your body’s signs and symptoms, and which option is needed.  And don’t be afraid to use it.

REMEMBER:
Too much one day won’t kill you.
Too little in one day will.

If you’ve updosed, tried drinking something to increase your salt/electrolytes and you still have symptoms, then Stress Dose.  If you take 10-20 mg and after an hour you still have the symptoms (especially the overlapping symptoms) then it is probably time to inject seek medical help.  If you vomit twice and can’t keep medication down, inject and seek help urgently.

IT IS BETTER TO PREVENT A CRISIS,
THAN TREAT A CRISIS.

Dr Google has good research. Use it

Does your Dr have this somewhere?

Sometimes "Google" and the internet have better medical knowledge than your Dr. Don't be afraid to use it, just make sure you use legitimate medical sites.

Show him this one instead!

But What Cost, a Medical Misadventure

When the Medical Side is Under Control

4 years on from Derek twice having his warfarin stopped by a hospital who’s excuse is “Oh, the Dr didn’t realise the importance of bridging” and we have, with very little help from them, managed to get Derek as stable as he will ever be.

 

We have got his Adrenal Insufficiency as under control as it will ever be.  We have worked out through experiement, what dosing works for him (and it’s not what they say in the books).  We have added other replacement medication (DHEA, Vit D) which is helping.  We are learning the symptoms of low cortisol.  We should have learned, we see them frequently.  Derek updoses as he needs, which is different to stress dosing when sick, and how to stress dose (double or triple HC) when he IS sick.

He is being driven to work, although he works mostly from home at the moment.

But what is the unseen cost of the medical fraturnity almost killing him?

It’s the costs they don’t compensate you for.  It’s the cost of things he can’t do any more. The things we now need to pay to get done.  For some it is things like having to employ a builder, for others, it is having to downsize their home, pay a cleaner, pay a gardener, or just not do things any more.

Why is employing a builder a hidden cost of his injury?

Bedroom RenovationBefore Derek suffered his CAPS event we used to work together to do renovations to the house.  This included turning our downstairs bedroom, shower room, and toilet, into a Master Bedroom with ensuite.

The cost of this exercise was extremely low.  We paid just for the materials used.  We paid a very small amount to have 2 power points moved.  We worked weekends, nights, and took a few days off work.

Top Left is the entrance foyer of our home.  You can see the door to the shower room, and the door to the downstairs toilet.  The bedroom is the door to the right.

Derek built the new wall (back of new wardrobe).  He then demolished the old wardrobe, we gutted the room, insulated, relined, and created a new Master Bedroom.

This was done a year before CAPS.

We have done a couple of small outside projects, with a lot of help from others including building a garden and a garden shed  and an deck outside the dining room.

Derek designed the deck, but we had to call on friends and family to build it.  It is an amazing asset,  and again, we paid for materials, and food for workers.  The help to build these things was fantastic.  But what about the bigger projects. Something the size of the Master Bedroom.   Like a kitchen?  Or insulating the Living Room?

We are looking at selling our home in a few years and find something slightly smaller.  There is a lot of new building going on around our area and we have to have our home at the right level to get the right money.  That means insulation in the Living Room is essential, as is a new kitchen.

Once upon a time we wouldn’t have thought anything of it.  We would have just purchased the materials, contracted a kitchen manufacturer to make the cabinets and bench top and over a period of a couple of months, done the work.  But not now.  And it was too big a job to ask friends to spend 2 days building.

So we had to pay a builder.  He is a great builder, with home renovations/alterations as his specialty, but still, we had to pay.  We have had to pay him for a lot of the other “little” jobs around as well.  Things that would normally take a weekend for Derek and I to do, now either doesn’t happen, or Chris comes to our rescue, but at a price.

So, Chris came in and gutted the lounge.  He then built a new ceiling, insulated the entire lounge, relined it.  We had to get a plasterer in to paint.  We had to get a painter in to paint it.

As for the kitchen.  It is a great Kitchen, I love it.  But again, we kept Chris employed where we could would once have done much of the work.

Gutted KitchenWith the help of a friend we did remove the old kitchen.

Most of the kitchen was still in good enough shape to be used elsewhere.  It was after all, a Designer kitchen.  It just wasn’t a well designed kitchen.

Our friend agreed to remove it with her and I doing the bulk of the work including carrying the units down to her trailer, taking them to her place, and putting them in her garage, for her to have installed in her home.  Derek did the little bits.  He unscrewed units from each other, and supervised, or held things while Sian and I did the hard labour.  Thank the Lord for Sian.  She has a new kitchen and Derek didn’t end up overdoing things.

But once everything was removed the walls were a complete mess.  Patches here and there.  Holes in the wall.  No insulation,  It had to be gutted.  We also needed to install a new window as one of the windows was sitting below the height of our new bench.

 

rebuilding

Chris, working hard (instead of Derek)

Enter Chris again. It wasn’t a big room.  For someone fit and healthy, which Chris is, it was a 5 day job to put up new ceilings, new wall lining, and install the new window.  Working along with the plumber and electrician it took 2 weeks in total.  Inbetween that, we had the kitchen company come in and install the units and bench top.

Then Derek and I could do some more work.  Well I could do some more work.  Derek “supervised”.  I plastered, sanded, and painted.  Derek did bits and pieces, working as he could, taking extra HC as he needed.  It took several days, with me doing the bulk of the work.  It was hard work, but rewarding.

Once we had the units installed it was time to put up the tile spashback behind the sink, and along the bench top.  Again, Derek cut a few tiles with a motorised tile cutter, and I did the installing of them.

KitchenFinished

The Finished Kitchen

All Up, for the living room and kitchen, it cost us $10,000 for work that 5 years ago we would have done ourselves.  This was the cost of employing a builder for work that Derek was once very capable of doing, and in a good timeframe.

So what is the hidden cost of a medical misadventure.  So far in the last 12 months it has added up to $10,000 and rising.  This, you do not get compensated for.

 

I understand that others would already have to get someone in for this, but when it is something you would have previously done yourself, it makes a difference. It certainly made a difference to the cost of the Kitchen.

For others it may be something different but there will always be hidden costs that are not compensated for, or that have no real measure and that are not thought about when it comes to the cost of a Chronic, or unexpected illness.

 

 

 

Building a Future

Those that are Friends on Facebook know that over the last month I have been working very hard getting our back yard sorted. Normally each year in Sep/Oct Derek would dig the gardens over, plant vegies, we would get the shrub gardens sorted and weeded.
We are aware that Derek is doing well now, but this may not last, so we are trying to get everything sorted so we can rest during the rest of summer, and know that we have a house we can relax in. We must turn the property into an easy care section so I can manage the work we both used to do.
Last year the gardening didn’t happen because Derek was too sick and I was too busy looking after him.
I attempted to dig the garden over before winter and ended up off work for 3 weeks because I put my back out. Derek tried, but after an hour, he had to sit down for the rest of the day, and take extra medication.
After we were told that Derek probably had a brain injury we realised that I really was going to have to take on more of the work. At the same time as that announcement, we were also told that Derek needed to up his Fludrocortisone from 0.05 to 0.1mg /day. He did. As a consequence his blood pressure has stabalised and he has been feeling a little better. Unfortunately, that didn’t take away any of the other problems.
So, if we needed vegetables to have this year, it was going to be up to me. But I couldn’t did the garden as it was.
Instead, as Derek was feeling good, I let him get his power tools, his measuring tape, and his spirit level out, and supervise MY building a garden. I have arthritis in my hands so holding a hammer has been hard, and painful, but I have the energy to do it.
It meant I had to lug the timber from the front of the house (where it was delivered) to the back. I had to lift, move, hammer, and completely construct, a raised gareden bed with easy drain, easy care garden mix.
It holds 3.75 cubic metres of soil, which I had to take by wheelbarrow from front to back.
Well I did it! I have a garden, with growing vegetables, and it looks great.
We then had to put a garden shed up. It is something we had wanted to do for years, but had never quite got around to doing. It too is up. Thanks in the bulk to my eldest son.
It even has a nice wood floor, which again, Derek cut, and I put down. Thank goodness I bought him a drop saw a few years ago. It has made it possible for Derek to do some of the work.
Also thank goodness in New Zealand you are given as much medication as you need, and some to spare. He has been living on higher than normal doses of Hydrocortisone, and still he is feeling it. The work routine has been 1 hours work, 2 hours break, 1 hours work, 2 hours watching me put the cut wood together.
Its amazing what you can do if you really want to.
The Garden.


The Garden Shed.