International Travel with a Chronic Illness

leaving-on-an-aircraft

Our Next Adventure Part 1

Having managed tripping up and down the North Island of New Zealand over the last 4 years, including flying, just to see how it would go, Derek and I want to venture a little further.

The Practice

To begin our preparation for an international flight, the first thing we did was try flying to Auckland.

It required a trip to the Airport, then flying to Auckland, and driving to Hamilton.

Derek took extra medication to fly.  He took extra hydrocortisone for the drive to Hamilton from Auckland.  He then lay down for a long rest when we got to Hamilton.  He also had to rest the next day, but that is normal when we travel any kind of distance.

On the whole, the trip was good.  We listened to others’ advice, had learned what Derek could manage, and when he needed to up dose.

Flying Further

This time we decided to go to Australia.  Originally our first trip overseas was going to be to Sydney or Melbourne for a weekend for a Show. After being offered a trip to Fiji earlier this year, and the realisation that a 2 day trip would be way too hard, we thought a longer trip would be better.  Because a friend with Addison’s was heading from Hong Kong to Brisbane for medical treatment, and we had friends in Brisbane, that was going to be our destination.

We are not the first to travel with chronic illness, and we won’t be the last.  When you look around the cue of people going to the flight, you don’t know who has a chronic illness, who has spent days and weeks preparing, and who has just grabbed a ticket and headed to the airport.

I asked my cousin, who’s husband has several serious medical issues, what they do to take a trip.

Trev just sorts all his medication and I just carry it…never had any problems, I think I have only been asked once and they were good about it. I never carry hospital documents but for you guys being a first since Derek has been sick, just get your GP to write a letter out lining the diagnosis and a list of the medications on the letter. Never really had problems with insurance just be up front about it all, you may not get full cover but shop around. We don`t stress about overseas travel, there is always a hospital where you go if things don`t go to plan. Just relax and enjoy the trip. We are probably not a good example…as we are pretty relaxed about it and just roll with it…lol…isn`t that naughty, but thats just us…great place we have just come back from there.

The trip they had returned from was a trip to celebrate 25 years since “Trev” had an organ transplant.  (By the way, I am totally in favour of organ transplants.  It saves lives, including that of my cousin’s husband so please think about donating organs if the unfortunate need should arise).

Booking the ticket.

We have made the decision to travel over to Australia.

Now What?

Do we need to get permission from the Dr?

We don’t believe so because we went to see her about going to Fiji with a work trip for Derek, and she said no, because of the risk of food poisoning, the possible need for INR while there, and the short time frame.

But she said that if we wanted to travel somewhere else, like Australia or England, then yes, she would make sure we could do it.

We bought the tickets. tickets

When I booked it, I also requested a wheelchair at both ends.  That meant an alert on the ticket booking, and I had to call a number, and speak to someone.

The flight is a Partner flight, which means we are booking through one airline, but the flight is provided through another, so there was a delay while the confirmed that the wheelchair was available.

We knew from experience going places with Derek he could not stand in line long.  He gets very fatigued just waiting at the supermarket, and if there are more than 2 in a line, he has to sit while we wait.

Then there is the timing of the flight.  We could fly out at 11am.  That would mean Derek could wake up as normal, and we could take our time.  But that also meant 9-12 hours flying as we would have to fly from Wellington to Auckland, wait for 2 or more hours, then fly to Brisbane.  We would arrive at night, and it would be a very long day.

That would take more out of him.

Alternatively we could fly out from Wellington at 7am.  And then fly for 4 hours, directly to Brisbane, and land at 8am Brisbane time.

This meant a lot less travel time, but a very early morning.  Derek normally wakes at 6am, takes his first round of HC, then goes back to sleep for an hour while he waits for his meds to kick in.

This trip would mean waking him at 4am to take his first round of HC, Drive to the airport, have breakfast, then check through Customs. (hopefully we haven’t got any fines that hold us back).

So next we book an appointment with the Dr.  We need:

  • A letter for treatment protocol (if he suffers an Adrenal Crisis)
  • A letter confirming he is able to fly (because of Antiphospholipid Syndrome and risk of DVT)
  • A list of medication (it needs to be declared at every port entry and exit).
  • Any meds he may run low on before he leaves, or soon after he gets back.
  • We also need to organise an INR when we land in Australia. This is the bit we are unsure of, but the essential bit to make sure it hasn’t dropped too low while flying, which could mean a blood clot.

Then there is Travel Insurance.

Normally you just buy it when you buy your tickets.  All you need for Australia is cover so if you get waylaid, you can get a change of ticket.  But if you have extra conditions, you need to tell them about them.  Then the cost goes way up.  It went up by $150 for Derek.

But we don’t know if we have declared everything as they didn’t have the ability to declare the catastrophic event he had.  And I hadn’t declared his prostate cancer.  Oh well, looks like a phone call.

I got two quotes.  So we needed to call both companies to see how things would change.

After a long phone call to each company, Derek’s insurance was going to cost $6 extra for the prostate cancer which is in remission.

Medication

Emergency Kit

The Take Every Where Kit

We would need a list to make sure we took everything.   It currently sat in multiple areas of the house.  We also needed to make sure it all had a proper prescription labels.

When my friend Wendy travelled from Hong Kong to Australia I told her to declare, declare, declare.  If she declared everything she would be fine.

I was going to work on the same principle.  But that is not the case for Derek as he takes DHEA (Dehydroepiandrosterone).  It is classed as an anabolic steroid, and therefore restricted.  Derek needs a licence to carry it into Australia, even as a prescription medication.

And one of his other medications needs authority to carry it out of New Zealand and then back into the country.

So, we have a Dr’s note x 2, we have an emergency letter, we have an application to take his medication into Australia.

We can only carry a month’s supply in and out of New Zealand but that’s fine because we are only away 6 days.

We have to wait to hear from the Dr regarding whether he needs 1 more medication for the trip, but otherwise, we have things ticked off that we need.

Getting all the advice is key to a successful trip.  So I went seeking advice.

Travel Advice from the Experts

The Addison’s Disease Self Help Group UK has some great advice:

  • Good general advice for long distance air travel includes:
  • Remember that air travel is dehydrating so you will need to drink more fluids than usual in the air. Drink alcohol, cola drinks, coffee and tea sparingly as these dehydrate the body further. If possible, carry a large bottle of water in your hand luggage. If you forget to bring your own water, be assertive about requesting extra refreshments from the cabin crew.
  • Walk around the plane as much as possible. Try to get up out of your seat every two hours to stretch your legs and keep the blood flowing.
  • Many chemist shops now stock knee-length support socks, which can help prevent the formation of blood clots that might lead to a deep-vein thrombosis (‘stroke’).
  • Adjust your watch to the time of your destination as the flight begins, and adjust your in-flight activities to that new time zone as well. Sleep through the in-flight meals, if necessary, to get attuned to the new time zone.
  • Try to book flights that allow you to arrive at your destination in the late afternoon or early evening local time, so that you get a night’s sleep at the end of your travelling. Flights which arrive in the early morning local time will leave you tired after travelling but having to stay up all the day before you get a proper night’s sleep.

So we missed the last one.

But we are going to stay at the house of an Addisonian, so they will know that Derek will be going to have a sleep when he arrives.

So everything we can think of is ticked off.  Now to wait.

Now to wait for the actual trip.

We are excited about the trip.  We have thought of all the possible issues, and taken care of everything we can.  Derek isn’t being wrapped in bubble wrap, but we are reducing the risk as much as possible without saying, “too hard, not going.”

Next Chapter – The trip.

I am hoping this will be a very dull chapter with just the excitement of having the Sunday lunch with other addisonian’s, and enjoying visiting somewhere I have never been.  I won’t apologise if my after trip post is boring, as that would be the best trip ever.

 

 

 

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But What Cost, a Medical Misadventure

When the Medical Side is Under Control

4 years on from Derek twice having his warfarin stopped by a hospital who’s excuse is “Oh, the Dr didn’t realise the importance of bridging” and we have, with very little help from them, managed to get Derek as stable as he will ever be.

 

We have got his Adrenal Insufficiency as under control as it will ever be.  We have worked out through experiement, what dosing works for him (and it’s not what they say in the books).  We have added other replacement medication (DHEA, Vit D) which is helping.  We are learning the symptoms of low cortisol.  We should have learned, we see them frequently.  Derek updoses as he needs, which is different to stress dosing when sick, and how to stress dose (double or triple HC) when he IS sick.

He is being driven to work, although he works mostly from home at the moment.

But what is the unseen cost of the medical fraturnity almost killing him?

It’s the costs they don’t compensate you for.  It’s the cost of things he can’t do any more. The things we now need to pay to get done.  For some it is things like having to employ a builder, for others, it is having to downsize their home, pay a cleaner, pay a gardener, or just not do things any more.

Why is employing a builder a hidden cost of his injury?

Bedroom RenovationBefore Derek suffered his CAPS event we used to work together to do renovations to the house.  This included turning our downstairs bedroom, shower room, and toilet, into a Master Bedroom with ensuite.

The cost of this exercise was extremely low.  We paid just for the materials used.  We paid a very small amount to have 2 power points moved.  We worked weekends, nights, and took a few days off work.

Top Left is the entrance foyer of our home.  You can see the door to the shower room, and the door to the downstairs toilet.  The bedroom is the door to the right.

Derek built the new wall (back of new wardrobe).  He then demolished the old wardrobe, we gutted the room, insulated, relined, and created a new Master Bedroom.

This was done a year before CAPS.

We have done a couple of small outside projects, with a lot of help from others including building a garden and a garden shed  and an deck outside the dining room.

Derek designed the deck, but we had to call on friends and family to build it.  It is an amazing asset,  and again, we paid for materials, and food for workers.  The help to build these things was fantastic.  But what about the bigger projects. Something the size of the Master Bedroom.   Like a kitchen?  Or insulating the Living Room?

We are looking at selling our home in a few years and find something slightly smaller.  There is a lot of new building going on around our area and we have to have our home at the right level to get the right money.  That means insulation in the Living Room is essential, as is a new kitchen.

Once upon a time we wouldn’t have thought anything of it.  We would have just purchased the materials, contracted a kitchen manufacturer to make the cabinets and bench top and over a period of a couple of months, done the work.  But not now.  And it was too big a job to ask friends to spend 2 days building.

So we had to pay a builder.  He is a great builder, with home renovations/alterations as his specialty, but still, we had to pay.  We have had to pay him for a lot of the other “little” jobs around as well.  Things that would normally take a weekend for Derek and I to do, now either doesn’t happen, or Chris comes to our rescue, but at a price.

So, Chris came in and gutted the lounge.  He then built a new ceiling, insulated the entire lounge, relined it.  We had to get a plasterer in to paint.  We had to get a painter in to paint it.

As for the kitchen.  It is a great Kitchen, I love it.  But again, we kept Chris employed where we could would once have done much of the work.

Gutted KitchenWith the help of a friend we did remove the old kitchen.

Most of the kitchen was still in good enough shape to be used elsewhere.  It was after all, a Designer kitchen.  It just wasn’t a well designed kitchen.

Our friend agreed to remove it with her and I doing the bulk of the work including carrying the units down to her trailer, taking them to her place, and putting them in her garage, for her to have installed in her home.  Derek did the little bits.  He unscrewed units from each other, and supervised, or held things while Sian and I did the hard labour.  Thank the Lord for Sian.  She has a new kitchen and Derek didn’t end up overdoing things.

But once everything was removed the walls were a complete mess.  Patches here and there.  Holes in the wall.  No insulation,  It had to be gutted.  We also needed to install a new window as one of the windows was sitting below the height of our new bench.

 

rebuilding

Chris, working hard (instead of Derek)

Enter Chris again. It wasn’t a big room.  For someone fit and healthy, which Chris is, it was a 5 day job to put up new ceilings, new wall lining, and install the new window.  Working along with the plumber and electrician it took 2 weeks in total.  Inbetween that, we had the kitchen company come in and install the units and bench top.

Then Derek and I could do some more work.  Well I could do some more work.  Derek “supervised”.  I plastered, sanded, and painted.  Derek did bits and pieces, working as he could, taking extra HC as he needed.  It took several days, with me doing the bulk of the work.  It was hard work, but rewarding.

Once we had the units installed it was time to put up the tile spashback behind the sink, and along the bench top.  Again, Derek cut a few tiles with a motorised tile cutter, and I did the installing of them.

KitchenFinished

The Finished Kitchen

All Up, for the living room and kitchen, it cost us $10,000 for work that 5 years ago we would have done ourselves.  This was the cost of employing a builder for work that Derek was once very capable of doing, and in a good timeframe.

So what is the hidden cost of a medical misadventure.  So far in the last 12 months it has added up to $10,000 and rising.  This, you do not get compensated for.

 

I understand that others would already have to get someone in for this, but when it is something you would have previously done yourself, it makes a difference. It certainly made a difference to the cost of the Kitchen.

For others it may be something different but there will always be hidden costs that are not compensated for, or that have no real measure and that are not thought about when it comes to the cost of a Chronic, or unexpected illness.

 

 

 

Know Your Own Numbers

Aside

Every few months we get a question from someone on a forum as to what a normal BP or Temperature, or blood result is.

Everyone will jump in with one of two answers:

  1. The books say…….
  2. Mine is……

Both of these are valid responses. However, the book “Normal” is simply what the middle of the Bell Curve is.

Most “normal” numbers are taken from a group (be it large or small) and are based on a Bell Curve of averages.

 

Bell Curve

In this image, all areas are “Normal” according to a “range” but where you sit will differ to the person sitting next to you.

The first thing Derek and I learned when he was diagnosed with AI is that there is no Strict Normal.  Most people will sit within a range, but they will not have identical numbers.

When you are sick, the first thing they check is BP, Temperature, Heart Rate and Oxygen Saturation and, if you are really lucky, they will do a few bloods.

That is great, but what if you normally sit in the High, and you are feeling off and now sitting in the Low end of the range. Although it might not be screaming “Warning… Out of Range for the BOOK”, if you know your own numbers, you can scream “Warning… Out of Range for ME!”

When Derek had pneumonia in 2014 he went into crisis before he showed real signs of being unwell. For him Adrenal Crisis (or low cortisol) can be his first sign of being unwell.

In 2015 when he got pneumonia (yes he has had it every year since 2012) we knew his “Normal” and once his temp showed to be out of HIS normal range we sought treatment. The problem is, for him normal is 35.9 so once his Temp hit and stayed at 37.3 (considered perfectly “normal”) we knew he had some sort of infection so sought help. We kept him out of hospital because the temp was one of the first signs. We knew HIS “normal” so were able to run with that, and get treatment underway before he became too sick.

The same thing happened this year with a throat infection. Because we know what his “normal” is, we could see that some things were off so he was already taking a bump in Hydrocortisone.

The problem was, he has no feeling on one side of his throat so by the time he had a sore throat he already had a throat infection. But, it wasn’t’ crazy out of control because again, he knew his normal readings and was already taking HC to fight what ever it was he was fighting.

How do we know his “normal”. Quite simple, we did regular checks of his BP over a 3 months period. And by regular I mean 3 times a day every day. And we charted it. We also did a 10 day Basil Temperature Check. We keep all his blood tests. I know it sounds crazy but what that means is we knew when:

  • he was over prescribed his Fludrocortisone when he first started it;
  • the fludrocortisone was becoming less affective, and therefore it needed to be increased;
  • he is low on cortisol rather than just tired;
  • he is low on salt and needs to get some more into him;
  • he has an infection that needs treatment;

Why is knowing YOUR numbers important?

If you have a chronic illness, YOU, not the Dr’s know when you need to seek help, and when you can manage it at home.

If you rock up to the hospital with a BP of 90/60 according to the books it is not a problem (maybe you need to drink a little more), but if your normal BP is 135/85, then 90/60 is a big difference and there is probably something wrong. Also, you have probably already tried drinking water. For some reason many Dr’s seem to think that you are an idiot because you haven’t been to medical school and they have (especially the young, newly trained or still training ones). If you can then turn to them and say “I know my normal, I have tried correcting this myself, I need help” then perhaps they will listen to you.

We had to do that once. A Dr tried to tell us that a creatinine level of 125 was “normal” for Derek because he had that level once before (yes, 3 months after kidney failure, which had been 18 months previous). We knew that for him normal was 110-115. She ignored us, and didn’t treat the dehydration (the 125 was a text book sign). He was admitted to hospital in Crisis and the next day a senior Dr came in, took a look at his bloods and said “put fluids up, he is dehydrated”. The same resident did not bother comparing a chest xray from when he was well, to the one she had taken that night. Had that occurred, she would have seen he also had the beginnings of pneumonia. But because she didn’t know HIS normal, she missed everything.

I wrote a complaint, not because she didn’t know his normal, but because she wouldn’t listen to us when we tried to tell her his normal.

Taking time when well, to find your normal may possibly save you a lot of stress when you are not “normal” for you.

Now you know it, forget it!

That is the Mantra of the Lecturers to Medical Student’s after being told about rare diseases.

I was talking to a Medical Student (just completed her 5th year) while I was with someone at the Emergency Department of a hospital recently.

We began talking about Chronic Illnesses and the fact that the families of those with Chronic Illness know more than many Dr’s about their particular condition.

She asked me about Derek’s illnesses…. “do you mind me asking what he has?”

No, I did not mind her asking. I am all for education.

I told her Antiphospholipid Syndrome. “Oh” she says, “I have heard of that”.

To say I was very surprised would be accurate.

I then asked her how she had heard about it.

Apparently, they were told about it in a Gynecology Lecture, had to learn about it in relation to pregnancy, and had a question on it in their 5th yr Exam.

They were then promptly told to forget about it, as they would never meet anyone with it.

She was not aware that Men could get it, or that it was something that can and does occur outside pregnancy!

Given that I know at least 4 women with it, and Derek has it, it isn’t that rare.

She knew nothing about the Catastrophic variant  or even that such a beast existed.

This is not the first time I have heard this about rare conditions.

Every time we query a Junior Dr or fully trained Nurse they say the same thing about Addison’s Disease/Adrenal Insufficiency. “We are told it exists, what the symptoms are, then told “but don’t worry, it is so rare you will never meet anyone with it”.  They are then shocked to hear about Derek.

If he is in hospital, the Medical Students are told to go see him, they will never meet anyone like him again!

No, they won’t. Because if they have a patient with either of Derek’s conditions, the patient will probably die before they are diagnosed.

Then there are those patients who suspect they may have a rare chronic illness is who are frequently (almost always) told “No, you can’t have that, it is too rare!”

Another useful thing all Medical Students are taught is: “if you hear hooves, look for horses, not Zebras.”

Just because a condition is rare does not mean it doesn’t exist.  It also does not mean that a patient is imagining things.

So what does this mean?  It simply means you look for Zebra’s if the Horses aren’t in the room.

How can you rely on the Medical Fraternity, when they so often get it wrong.

That is not to say they should know everything. What they should be doing is listening to their patients. Don’t rule out things just because they are Rare, or not “normally” found in that sex.

Listen carefully to your patients. If what you think is wrong comes back negative, give your patient the benefit of the doubt. Do the basic test to see if it IS  a “Zebra in the Room”. If you want to be arrogant, do the test to prove your patient wrong.

What is the worst that can happen?  The Patient is right, and you have to apologize.

Heaven forbid a Dr should find out they are not GOD!

Waiting for a Life Line

This blog was going to be about a thing called DHEA. That will come later.

This is more important because I am really annoyed, and need to get it out there. There are lots of others, not only in New Zealand, but all over the world, that suffer this problem.

It’s when you fall through the cracks.

We had it described to us that Derek is one of those people.

It’s like an apple sorting system. The tree grows an apple, that apple is picked. The really bad apples get taken out and put in the pigswill. The rest are then put through different tests/checks. As the apples go through the system, the low grade ones are gradually discarded or put aside for fruiting, juicing, discarding, until all you have left is export grade apples.

Every now and again an export grade apple gets thrown out with the bad ones. It falls through the sorting system and ends up in the pigswill instead of on the shop shelf.

Liken Derek to that apple. He goes through the first check point, and falls off the belt with the pigswill apples, but hey, they get re-checked just in case, so that’s ok. Someone will discover he is actually a good apple, and put him back on the right track.

NO!

He has AGAIN fallen through the system. And I am getting quite mad about it. I should not have to spend my life advocating for him, and fighting the Medical Fraternity to get things done. It’s not that they don’t want to do things, they just keep stuffing up.

2.5 years ago, he experienced a Medical Misadventure and suffered multiple organ failure. They didn’t notice (even though it was pointed out to them) that he suffered a brain injury at the time.

After 23 days in hospital (the first 5 fighting for his life) he was discharged from Wellington Hospital (CCDHB) and handed back to Hutt Valley Hospital (HVDHB). He then spent the next 12 weeks at home.

He was referred to a Rheumatologist for his Antiphospholipid Syndrome (APS), and consequent Catastrophic APS. He was referred to Endocrinology for his now trashed adrenal glands.

He SHOULD have also been referred to Occupational/Physiotherapy, for rehabilitation given that he suffered lung damage, transient heart damage and was laid up for 15 weeks trying to get some form of health back.

He wasn’t. He was examined by the Rheumy who said “keep taking warfarin, you look great, see you in a year”. He was seen by his Endo who said “decrease your HC to what the book says, oh, maybe you could also take fludro as well, see you in a year”.

We went back to both of these a year later. Same thing.

In the mean time, I am becoming more and more concerned about other things that are happening to Derek. Each visit to a medical “professional” I mention that he has difficulty swallowing. Each visit we are told, yes, we need to look at that. We will talk to/refer you to XYZ…

After changing General Practitioners in August 2014, we finally got a referral. On 18 Dec 2014 Derek went for a gastroscopy (read about that elsewhere, it’s a story all by itself). At the end of that visit we discussed with the Endoscopy Registrar the fact that the problem is at the top of his throat, between his mouth and his shoulder line. The Gastroscopy looks lower down.

The Registrar agreed that the Gastroscopy was not going to find the issue, and he needed to be referred to another department. Hang on. Haven’t I heard this somewhere before, MULTIPLE times? The question we were then asked, “did we want the her to do the referral, or our GP?”.

We definitely wanted the Registrar to do it, so we knew it would go to the right department in a good timeframe.

On 2nd Februaray we received a letter about an X-ray appointment. Yay, finally somebody that actually did as they promised, and sent the referral. Now they could do the correct X-ray to see why he couldn’t swallow properly.

WRONG!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

This was a repeat X-ray 6 months post his last bout of Pneumonia. When we checked in for that x-ray, I asked about the other one. NO, not in the system, never referred, not happening. Best course of action is to go back to the Endoscopy Dept and ask them what happened.

While sitting in the waiting room for Derek to have his X-ray he received a txt message which I read. Hello. It’s a reminder for an appointment for Monday at Rheumatology. That’s great, but what is the apt for, and why are we receiving a reminder. We have never received a letter telling us about the apt. Oh, did I mention that today is Friday?

After the Xray, we trudge up to Level 6, and ask about the reminder, but no original letter telling us about the apt. “Oh, we send them out about a week out from the apt in case it has to be changed”. That’s fine but again, Today is FRIDAY ,and the appointment is for MONDAY. The snail mail has been delivered today, and there is no letter telling us of the apt.

After this discussion, we trudge down to the ground floor again, and along the corridor to Endoscopy. We are told that the notes say that our GP is to do the referral. “Actually, No. We clearly agreed that the Registrar would do it, so we knew it would happen”. The Receptionist asks us to wait while she goes out the back and tries to sort it.

The Manager of the Dept comes out, she has the referral in her hand, which has been sent to the right dept? We told her that it hadn’t been sent anywhere. There was no record of it on the system.

She asks us to wait while she goes to X-ray herself to sort it. She then comes back and promises she will sort it. We try to explain our frustration at the inability of the system to get it right with Derek EVER.

We leave the hospital with a promise from the Manger of that department, that she will get back to us today regarding the referral.

We have now had a phone call back to say that it has been put on to another department, she is waiting for it to be “triaged” which means some obscure little officious clerk, at some desk somewhere, will put it in the system as “non urgent”, which means they have 4 months to act on it.

While I was sitting in the Endoscopy department waiting for the Manager, I was listening to the booking clerk making a booking. There is no denying that when they get a referral there is a timeframe for which they must make a booking. They DELIBERATELY book you on the last possible date to fit the timeframe. I you are classed as semi urgent and must be seen in 3-4 weeks, they put you on the last day of week 4, even if there are spaces available on the first day of week 3! I actually heard her doing this.

We are due to have another phone call from HVDHB to confirm his booking on Monday. We have been promised (and I have the phone call recorded), that once the decision is made as to urgency, the Manager of Endoscopy will get back to the relevant department and tell them that they need to hurry up and make it urgent.

I then jokingly asked if they had a system in place to make sure that the booking didn’t clash with any other booking Derek might have (he gets lots). I was gobsmacked (absolutely shocked) to find that NO, there is no system in place for that! They have to manually check!   And we all know how many of the booking clerks would waste their time doing that!

So where does that leave us? In the hurry up and wait chair again.

We currently have a Formal Complaint being investigated by the Health and Disability Commissioner about his treatment at CCDHB. Once we have seen the report on that, I will be putting in a complaint about the HVDHB and their treatment of Derek.

Sometimes all the stars align and you sail through life with ease. Other times, all the mud pits align, and you end up sitting in pigswill for years until someone throws you a lifeline.

We are still waiting for our lifeline!

Medical mishap almost killed man

Quote

In my post “One Year On” I stated that we held Wellington Hospital CCDHB responsible Derek’s CAPS event, and that they could have taken measures to prevent it.

After months of investigating, in March 2014 we contacted the CCDHB to tell them our thoughts on what happened.

Several months ago we were told that there was to be a full investigation into the event to see if they could work out what happened.

That investigation is now complete and they have agreed with us that they failed Derek at every turn.

We received a copy of the report 2 weeks ago, but didn’t agree with what it said, and many of the assumptions they made. We went to a meeting with the writers of the report and as a result, they have re-written the report and accepted even more blame.

Under Findings it states:

The review team consider the root cause of the adverse event was communication failure. The final plan was neither communicated to the patient in full in a manner that ensured the patient had received and understood the final plan, nor was his understanding of the plan checked. It was not identified during the admission for surgery that the pan was not being followed as expected.

There is a system in place in all hospitals that, when an adverse event happens for whatever reason, it should be investigated.

Also under Findings:

The review team note that the reportable event was indicated but not entered when it was identified that the patient had developed CAPS and that the anticoagulation plan had not be fully implemented.

In the Cover Letter they acknowledge:

Due to the failures in communication of the plan to Derek, and the lack of detailed documentation in his clinical record, we did not recognise that the intended plan had not been completed until Derek wrote to the CCDHB in March 2014 with concerns.

Our goal in complaining, was to ensure there are processes in place to try and prevent this happening to anyone else. They now have to put in place, set procedures which must be followed.

Hopefully this will not happen again.

At the same time we asked that a very special Dr got mentioned. Her name is Dr Helen Myint, I may have named her before, but we firmly believe it was her diligence that saved Derek’s life.

The final part to their admission of errors, is the public report they must do.  As a result Derek ended up on the front page of the Dominion Post in Wellington.

Medial Mishap

MEDICAL MISHAP: Upper Hutt man Derek Edson developed a chronic illness when doctors failed to note his blood-clotting condition before cancer surgery.

MEDICAL MISHAP:

The medication Derek Edson needed to survive cancer surgery was waiting to be picked up from his local pharmacy – but no-one from Wellington Hospital told him about it.

As a result, the Silverstream resident nearly died, and will now have chronic exhaustion and ill-health for life.

The 56-year-old computer programmer brought a complaint against Capital & Coast District Health Board – one of 454 cases of medical misadventure recorded nationwide in the 2013-14 year.

Because of a pre-existing blood-clotting condition, he should have been taking a drug called Clexdane before his prostate cancer surgery in September 2012. The drug had been ordered and was waiting for him – but he didn’t know.

After surgery, his health went into a rapid tailspin, and his adrenal glands permanently died – a condition known as Addison’s disease. He suffered severe liver and kidney damage, pneumonia and fluid in the lungs. “I kept going downhill.”

On a good day, he crashes into bed at 8pm after a day of work. On a bad day, he is in the emergency department, facing a coma or death within 72 hours.

He said: “I don’t have the initial upset I used to have – I can’t afford to.”

Prostate cancer campaign ahead

Finally Prostate Cancer is being taken as seriously as Breast and Cervical Cancer.  Derek is “in remission”, i.e. he does not currently have active cancer because his Dr is proactive in screaning.  Had he not been, who know what state it would have been in, a year from now.  2 years makes all the difference in catching Prostate Cancer in time to act, or in time to “treat” until death.

http://www.stuff.co.nz/national/health/9450677/Prostate-cancer-campaign-ahead